About

Natasha is an an ethnographer, social anthropologist, and personal essayist who inquires into the practices of everyday life to illuminate processes of social and cultural transformation. She is currently a visiting fellow at the Anthropology Department of Harvard University, and is completing a PhD at the Scott Polar Research Institute of the University of Cambridge.

Through both an academic and creative lens, she explores the interconnectedness of rootedness and movement, environment and memory, politics and material life. Drawing together ethnographic fieldwork from Fenno-Scandinavia to East Africa, her research focuses on the making of things to reveal the underlying mechanisms by which people creates ties to land and community. In complementary ways, her writing examines processes of memory and place making, especially through objects and their production.

The work has implications for indigenous and other social movements that seek tangible claims to land and identity. Addressing issues of transnational migration, displacement, and the growth of global economies, the work sheds light on social transformations associated with human movement and global connectivity.

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I am an ethnographer, social anthropologist, and personal essayist exploring everyday practices of social and cultural transformation. I am currently Associate Professor of Social Anthropology at UiT The Arctic University of Norway after completing my PhD at the University of Cambridge.

Through both an academic and creative lens, I explore the interconnectedness of rootedness and movement, environment and memory, politics and material life. Drawing together ethnographic fieldwork from Fenno-Scandinavia to East Africa, my research focuses on the making of things to reveal the hidden ways that people creates ties to land and community. Complementing this work, my creative nonfiction examines processes of memory and place making.

The work has implications for Indigenous and other social movements that seek tangible claims to land and identity. Addressing issues of transnational migration, displacement, and the growth of global economies, the work sheds light on the social transformations of human movement and global connectivity.

CV available upon request. Contact me at nc427@alumni.cam.ac.uk